Blog | Lindsey Smallwood

Listen & Learn: Philemon & Colossians Weekly Talks (Audio Files)

Lindsey Smallwood

Last week I announced the publication of my new Bible study guide book - Philemon & Colossians: In Christ Alone. It's been so fun sharing it with all of you. There are still copies available with special discounts and free shipping for small groups.

This week, I'm thrilled to share a bonus component for the five week study on Philemon & Colossians - audio files of the weekly talks you can stream or download to use in your small group. Each talk is 10-20 minutes long and contains insights into the chapter, along with some personal stories and other Scripture connections. 

Thanks for reading and listening along!

Note: You're welcome to listen along even if you're not doing the study. Just know that on week 1, I spend the first 5 and 1/2 minutes tackling some study-related administrative stuff - so if you're only looking for Scripture talks, fast forward to 5 min, 30 seconds into the Philemon message and you'll be good to go!

Want to know more about the book? Check out Philemon & Colossians: In Christ Alone here

Note: You're welcome to listen along even if you're not doing the study. Just know that on week 1, I spend the first 5 and 1/2 minutes tackling some study-related administrative stuff - so if you're only looking for Scripture talks, fast forward to 5 min, 30 seconds into the Philemon message and you'll be good to go!

Want to know more about the book? Check out Philemon & Colossians: In Christ Alone here

What I Pray for My Children

Lindsey SmallwoodComment

I want a lot for my kids.

I want happy days playing in the sunshine and the chance to for them to learn to ride a bike. I want memories made by the pool on long summer afternoons and the joy of conquering winter’s biggest sledding hill.

More importantly, I want them to develop in all the right ways. Physically, relationally, intellectually, spiritually. I long for their little lives to flourish, growing into their full potential as people, loving God and loving others the way they were made to love.

But raising kids is not another project.

If you want to write a book, you set a goal of two chapters a week, clear some time in your calendar and get after it. If you want to lose 20 pounds, you throw away the chocolate and reacquaint yourself with the elliptical machine. Turning tiny humans into actual full-fledged adult humans is different, because:

  1. it takes 18+ years, and,
  2. ultimately they get to decide how much they will develop.

Continue reading at Middle Places by clicking here.

How to Start a Summer Book Club

Lindsey SmallwoodComment

...in which I share about our super fun summer friend group and invite your own group to dive into the book I wrote this spring!

Summer is my favorite. 

I know there are people who live for crunching leaves in the fall, those who can't wait to hit the ski hills every weekend in the winter and the gardeners among us who live for spring's planting season. But oh man, for me, summer is where it's at. 

I love short sleeves and sunshine, days spent at the pool or the beach and the long hours of daylight that somehow make you feel like anything is possible. Some of my best memories are summer memories, like the time I decided to work at a circus camp for 12 weeks or the year I drove cross country with six friends in a mini-van.

Last summer my family and I had just moved to Colorado a few months before. We were settling into life in our new home when all of sudden, summer appeared. And when summer started, everything else ended. My Mom's Group. My Bible Study. The Community Playgroup I'd joined. All of my regular activities went on hiatus. So I knew I needed something more. 

I decided to start a summer book club.

Here's how:

1) Ask some people.

For real. Just put yourself out there. It's as easy as sending some emails. I asked a random assortment of women I'd met in different places since we moved. Some already knew each other and some didn't. A few said no - but most said yes! Many of them have since told me how thankful they were that I was willing to go first so our little group could be born. 

2) Choose a time.

Figure out what works for everyone. Everyone I asked had young kids, so we decided to meet in the morning so our kids could play outside while we talked. If you're working, night-time probably works better. 

Some of my super fun summer book club friends - and a few of our teeny-tinies.

Some of my super fun summer book club friends - and a few of our teeny-tinies.

3) Find a spot to meet. 

We live in the dorms. Much as I love to play hostess, there's literally not room in our place for 10 other women and their kiddos. But that's okay! I still started the group, even without knowing where we'd all meet together. Before our first meeting, I send out a question about ideas on where to meet and a couple of the gals volunteered their homes. 

4) Pick a book.

There are so many great books out there. You could go fiction (The NightengaleWhere'd You Go, Bernadette? and Me Before You are some recent faves) or non-fiction (I always recommend The Geography of Bliss and Boys in the Boat is a great one).  Last summer we decided to go the get-to-know-you route and do a small group workbook on friendship by Stephanie May Wilson. It was fabulous.  

If you're interested in a more spiritual selection, there are so many great reads to choose from. But if I may - this is where I invite you to pick me!

Over the winter, I wrote a Bible study guide for small groups on the New Testament books of Philemon and Colossians, which are fascinating letters with ideas about identity, calling and living in community. This spring 60 women in our church piloted the study in small groups. And now, I'm thrilled to bring it to all of you!

The book is designed to be completed in 5 weeks, although those who prefer to move at a slower pace could easily do it in 10 instead. There are chapter introductions, daily homework, devotional reflections, and small group questions. In addition to the book, there are short talks for each chapter (soon to be available here) which you can stream or download for personal or small group use. And, just for fun, I've created adult coloring pages which you'll receive as a free download when you order.

If you're thinking about a summer book club - just do it! And if you're interested in using my new Bible Study guide, I'd love to send you one. They're available for individual purchase by using the link below, or contact me with larger orders, I offer discounts and free shipping for small groups! 

Happy Summer! Here's to good time with your people in the months to come.

Order Your Copy of Philemon & Colossians: In Christ Alone

What Do You Want?

Lindsey SmallwoodComment

Over at Middle Places this month, our writers are exploring what it means to be in the middle of healing. I'm on the blog sharing what I've learned from answering Jesus' question to a blind guy on the road.

Sometimes I pray for what’s right, instead of what’s real.

Like right now – I hope my good friend who is fighting cancer will be healed, but I don’t know whether God will do it so instead of praying for healing, I pray that God’s will be done.

And I would love to know what the timeline is for changes coming in my husband’s job, but instead of telling the Lord that, I find myself saying things like “I trust you with our future” and “I know you’ve always been faithful.”

The thing is, all of those things are true. It’s good to pray for God’s will to be done. I do trust Him with our future. He has always been faithful. But those aren’t the thoughts and feelings bouncing around my heart most days. Instead, it’s fear about what will happen to our family or a deep yearning to see my friend’s pain end.

Recently, I reread the story of Bartimaeus in Mark 10. In the passage, Jesus passes a blind man named Bartimaeus as he’s walking down the road to his destination. The man calls out to Him, and Jesus stops, asking him this question: “What do you want me to do for you?”

What do you want?

Continue reading at Middle Places by clicking here.